First Thoughts About Nintendo Labo And Things I Want to Do with It

After seeing First Look at Nintendo Labo, I tweeted the following:

While Nintendo Labo may seem childish, boring, and maybe even confusing to some people, I’ve seen others (even of adult age) get very excited about this. I’m not saying this is the same type of excitement you’d get about a new major video game (you’re not getting aboard the “Hype Train” as many have called it), but rather that feeling of seeing an exciting new toy on TV as a child. The word I would use for such a feeling is “giddiness”.

I’ve even seen some many people call the products “over-priced cardboard” or something along those lines, but the software for this couldn’t have been developed for free. In other words, the price would logically include the software as well.

Nintendo Labo releases April 20, 2018. If you know what Nintendo Labo is, feel free to continue reading, otherwise, visit https://labo.nintendo.com. The images in this article also come from there.


My First Thoughts (Before Release):

blades-how

I’ll admit, even though I thought the IR-camera on the right Joy-Con would be used for something cool, I never thought I’d be able to put it into a cardboard piano and make music with it. Like I said in my tweet, it’s all very intriguing to me how the hardware and software can have a cardboard interface.

Any parents reading my article may be wondering how this would benefit a child. While I’m not a parent, I can see playtime being combined with learning and even art if you have some artistic tools and/or materials.

In terms of art, all you need is a willing artist, some tools and/or materials, as well as the instructions for them to keep the art separate from the technology. This way none of it gets damaged or ruined.

In terms of learning, the software will include a “Discover” tab, letting the user see how each Toy-Con works. In addition, once the Make, Play, and Discover tabs are all explored, it unlocks the Nintendo Labo Garage. The Garage allows users to, using node-based computer-logic and extra materials, make their own cardboard-based mechanisms (or “Toy-Con”) for use with the Nintendo Switch. This can be especially beneficial to future computer engineers.


What I Want to Do:

In the following section, I’ll go in order of when I thought of each activity. With that in mind, I’ll first dive into something I studied for over nine years and still enjoy now, being music. I’ll later go into the Garage feature and potential Garage-related ideas I have for this blog.

bgphoto18
Interesting fact: music is the only thing scientists have found that can activate the entire brain, I learned that in a class in high school.

I learned about and practiced piano for six years, and then I was a percussionist in band class for three years. There is a recording studio as part of the Nintendo Labo Variety-Kit that I plan to use. If necessary, I’ll import my recordings in any way possible to my computer. This way I could put my recordings together and maybe eventually upload them somewhere. I also have plenty of musically talented family members, so help should be there when I need it.

bgphoto28
“Labo Man” is cool, but I don’t see a need for him in Super Smash Bros.

On the Garage side of things, I want to make custom Toy-Con even if only to experiment more with computer logic, although I will likely need inspiration from others to figure out what I want to make. Inspiration is where potentially spotlighting others’ creations could come in handy. Even if I still don’t know what to build, I like seeing others’ D.I.Y. projects, and I would probably have more to say about them than would fit in a Twitter post. I hope all of us can have fun being creative with Nintendo Labo.


What About You?

So what do you want to do with Nintendo Labo, and what are you excited for regarding it? Feel free to leave a comment below giving any thoughts you may have about Labo. I’d love to see them.

And finally, have a great day!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s